Why Does My Dog Pee on Other Dogs?

Dogs at dog park

Dogs tend to pee on other dogs to establish their dominance. This need to do so could take place due to several reasons that we can explore in further detail through this article.

Once you have determined the reason, you can then go through and apply a few steps to stop and prevent this kind of behavior.

Potential Reasons

Let’s take a look at some reasons behind dogs peeing on other dogs.

Anxiety

There can be several triggers in a dog’s environment that might be making them anxious, causing them to act out by peeing on other dogs.

Some possible reasons for such anxiety can include threats from other dogs, new people around them, disputes with other dogs, punishment from people around them, unpleasant situations at home and a lot more.

As a way to calm themselves down or re-establish their position, they may come across other dogs in their way and pee on them.

Dogs that feel anxious may even pee more on other dogs as compared to other potential reasons on this list.

Social Situations

There might be something in the social environment of your dog that is leading to this kind of behavior.

For example, if your dog comes across a new dog or a particular dog that they always bark at, this can cause them to pee on them.

Similarly, if they encounter a dog of the opposite sex (especially if male dogs encounter female dogs), then it is possible for this behavior to occur.

In some situations, your dog might just be curious and can be sniffing around. Alternatively, if another dog is sniffing your dog in the middle of them peeing, this could cause them to redirect their pee on the other dog.

Changes

If your dog notices any immediate changes in the environment around them, they can respond to these in the form of peeing on other dogs.

These changes could be anything that your dog has not seen before. For example, if you take a different walk that your dog is unfamiliar with, it could keep them on edge throughout the walk.

Similarly, if you go to a new place with strangers and new dogs nearby, your dog might feel the need to establish dominance in that territory to feel safer and more secure.

Lack of Neutering/Spaying

If your dog has not yet been neutered or spayed, it might still be able to reproduce. In this case, this could be a major reason behind dogs peeing on other dogs.

Both male and female dogs tend to do this whenever they see another dog of the opposite sex. This behavior is biological in nature, acting as a way for dogs to find other dogs to mate with or to keep away.

This can be a way for dogs to indicate to the target dog as well as to other dogs that they will be the ones to mate with the dog, thereby establishing their dominance.

Marking Territory

Most dogs tend to be very protective and loyal in terms of their temperament. In such cases, whenever they notice that another dog is trying to interfere or enter their territory, peeing on them can be a way for them to mark the territory as theirs.

This can be a way for them to protect both you as well as themselves from other dogs that they view as a threat. They may also have pack-oriented behavior that causes them to claim their own superiority and dominance in the given area.

This can most commonly take place whenever you take your dog on a walk where they come across other dogs.

Medical Issues

Although this is a more irregular reason for your dog to pee on other dogs, it could explain some instances when your dog acts out of character and performs this kind of behavior.

For instance, if your dog has an infection in their bladder or urinary tract, they might not be able to control themselves, causing them to pee on a nearby dog.

Further, if they have a kidney problem or issues with their genitalia, they might have to relieve themselves wherever they are with a nearby dog being the victim of that.

This is not exactly a way of marking their dominance but can still be an occasional reason.

Also Read: How to Stop Dog From Peeing On Couch

How to Stop It

Let’s look at some steps you can take to stop this kind of behavior.

Determine the Problem

The first thing you should do is try to figure out what the problem is with your dog that is causing this behavior.

You should try to rule out any medical problems by taking your dog to the vet and getting a check-up, after which you can go ahead with the recommended treatment if any.

If your dog is physically healthy, the reason is most likely to be a stressor in their environment such as a new dog, a threatening stranger, a mating interest, a new territory or more.

Once you pinpoint the exact problem, you can go about solving it through training, keeping a safe distance or spaying or neutering your dog.

Maintain Distance

Dogs generally tend to pee on other dogs whenever you take them out on a dog, as this is where they come across other dogs.

If you notice this kind of pattern, it is important for you to establish a physical distance between your dog and the other dogs.

Your dog will curiously keep sniffing, but you must keep them on a leash while walking in public. If they make the move to pee on another dog, you can tug their leash and pull them back.

You can also walk them or exercise with them in an empty or enclosed space to prevent this behavior.

During such situations, you must also stay vigilant and not exhibit any kind of fear when you come across another dog otherwise your dog might sense this shift in your own behavior, leading to them peeing on another dog to offer protection or act out of anxiety.

Also Read: How to Stop Dog Urine From Killing Grass

Provide Training

Providing training to your dog can be an effective way to get rid of this problem once and for all.

Teaching your dog some basic commands and training them to respond to you and obey you can help you control their behavior when they come across other dogs.

You can do this using positive reinforcement. Offering treats, rewards or praises in return for the desired behavior can gradually get rid of the peeing habit.

If you don’t think you can manage this on your own, you can also consult a professional to either teach you strategies or to conduct the training in their own way.

While this might take some time to put into practice until your dog is fully trained, it can also be a good long-term solution.

Spay/Neuter

If your dog still has the ability to reproduce, then that might be the main reason behind them peeing on other dogs, causing them to establish their superiority and territory when it comes to potential mates.

In this case, the solution is to simply get your dog spayed or neutered since this can significantly reduce the occurrence of this kind of urine-marking behavior.

You should try to get your dogs spayed or neutered while they are still young to reduce territorial and aggressive tendencies in terms of mating.

If your dog gets old enough, the behavior can have the risk of becoming a norm that might take a lot more effort to get rid of.

Interact with the Other Dog

If your dog continues to pee on one particular dog each time they come across each other, the solution might be to familiarize your dog with the other dog, provided that you have the option of doing so.

You can start off by initiating the interaction yourself and then gradually encouraging your dog to interact as well.

If your dog tries to pee on the other dog, you can hold it back and use your training commands. Once you manage to establish an acquaintance, the marking may stop.

Do Not Punish Your Dog

No matter which method you opt for to get rid of the urine-marking behavior, it is important to avoid resorting to punishments of any sort on your dog.

This could make your dog even more fearful, leading to more anxiety that could only cause them to act out more instead of solving the problem, since part of the reason that dogs pee on other dogs is out of fear or stress.

Using positive reinforcement and creating a safe space for your dog will quicken the process for you.

Also Read: Why Do Dogs Pee on Fire Hydrants?

Final Remarks

Those were some of the main reasons that can cause your dog to pee on other dogs. We have also seen the ways in which you can reduce or stop this kind of behavior from occurring.

Make sure you first get medical problems out of the way, after which you can deal with more social and environmental issues in a positive way.